Siena’s Fall Semester Success Story

They say home is where the heart is, and for many of us, a piece of our hearts will always rest at Siena. Not only is Siena home because we live here, it’s home because this is where we pull all-nighters, meet our closest friends, travel abroad, overcome our fears, excel academically, laugh, cry, love, and explore. 

Our campus is green and gold by nature! Photo courtesy of Kiera Mitru.

While the Siena experience was uniquely altered this semester, many of us found joy in the small things like the colors of the leaves changing, the Siena Squirrels Instagram account, games of Among Us with friends, and informal check-ins with professors at the beginning of Zoom classes. To say the least, it’s been strange to experience the same place in such a drastically different way. While this semester was challenging, it allowed space for students and faculty alike to hold their memories of Siena a little bit closer, and inspired us all to continue setting goals in pursuit of a more “normal” future. 

One thing that was consistent among almost completely new policies was one of the most beautiful campuses in the country. Some days, after being cooped up on Zoom all day, there was nothing more comforting than navigating the place I have come to know like the back of my hand. During past semesters, I never really took the time to intentionally walk around campus, since my different obligations called me all over the place anyway. This semester, I jumped at every opportunity to eat or study outside, which helped me to develop a deeper appreciation for our campus and the beautiful backdrop that surrounds us. 

Nothing beats a Siena Sunset! Photo courtesy of Kiera Mitru.

Due to the unconventional structure of this past semester, many students had to organize alternative plans for their extracurricular activities. Some clubs met virtually, while others hosted speakers and panelists to campus via Zoom in order to ignite the educational flame on campus, and I’ve never seen it burn brighter. 

During the Fall of 2020 there have been some massive headlines, many of which have had to do with the recent presidential election. This year, students and faculty alike helped the Siena Community as they registered to vote and detailed an endless amount of voting plans. This community organization was enthusiastic and crucial to the civic engagement of our campus and alumni network. There were election town halls hosted by the Political Science Department, registration form and absentee ballot dropboxes throughout campus, and a ton of student activism both on and off social media. This excitement was contagious and encouraged Saints to cast (what was for many) their first vote in a presidential election.  

Outside of the classroom, the election and the pandemic combined provided a completely separate, but just as important learning opportunity for each of us. These global and political circumstances required an abundance of patience and listening to one another. This year has felt like it might never end, and as we round the final corner of the Fall semester, we’re greeted with the promise of a new year. While there is just as much uncertainty in the air as there was in August, our community is rising to the occasion as we carry forward the same optimism, respect, and care that we bring to each semester. As we set our sights on the next horizon, may we apply diligence, kindness, and healing to the goals we set today, and all the days to come.

Yet another Siena sunset over the tent-speckled quad. Photo courtesy of Kiera Mitru.

Writing, Fighting, and Striving for Justice

There are few things more electrifying than sitting in on a live poetry reading. One would think that sharing poetry in an online format would dull the experience, but that was not the case on the evening of October 14th, as Siena’s Latinx Student Association and the Damietta Cross-Cultural Center extended a virtual welcome to the Adios America team, Melania-Luisa Marte and Angélica Maria Aguilera.

The poetry duo hosted events for two nights in a row, each of them encouraging reflection and creativity. On Wednesday evening, the duo shared a powerful poetry reading performance and on Thursday evening, they organized an interactive poetry workshop for students and professors alike.

Through the medium of poetry, Angélica Maria and Melania-Luisa addressed themes of allyship, racial justice, microaggressions, the exoticization of women, and the necessity of decolonizing literature. One poem that was especially powerful had to do with rethinking the power and influence that modern literature has granted William Shakespeare. One of Angélica Maria Aguilera’s iconic lines was, “Methinks it’s time to flip the script, Shakespeare”. Looking at canonical literature through this lens, it is clear to see that there is a lack of representation in the work that is deemed “classic”. These works continue to be required readings for many literature and writing courses however, with all due respect, they don’t hold a candle to topics that are important to explore and discuss in the year 2020.

The poetry duo, Melania-Luisa Marte (Left) and Angélica Maria Aguilera (Right) are currently on a performance tour entitled “Adios America” on which they share poetry and insight into the work of intersectional feminism, anti-racism, and advocacy for justice. Photo courtesy of themujerista.com.

During Thursday night’s event, Angélica Maria and Melania-Luisa addressed topics including common microaggressions, how rest is a form of resistance, and guided their virtual audience through a series of writing prompts centering around identity. Participants started a conversation about beauty politics, anti-racism work both on and off campus, exotification, racialization, and their personal experiences either witnessing or receiving microaggressions in their lives. 

Another powerful moment of the evening came through a small meditation, where Melania-Luisa invited those tuned in on Zoom to visualize their happy place and write down where they found it, what was in it, what they felt, what they saw etc. The Poet then encouraged viewers to think of how one’s community would navigate this space. Is there room for collectivity? Is there visibility and celebration of our individuality and differences? These thinking points resonated with the audience, who engaged in discussion following this reflection activity. 

While asking essential questions regarding anti-racism work both inside and outside one’s immediate locality, Angélica Maria and Melania-Luisa stressed the importance of community and collectivity in this work. Melania-Luisa stating that, “We need community. Our ancestors survived through their connections to community and collectivity”. As students seeking to carry forward the Siena’s intentions of diversity, optimism, respect and service, these words could not be more crucial. There is power in numbers; Siena Saints host the intention, dedication, and commitment to service that is necessary to enact sustainable change.

In times as unprecedented as these, the Siena Community is stronger together. We must respect, serve, care, and share compassion for those around us now and always – it’s ours to do along the road to restorative justice and peace for all.

Even in the Face of a Global Pandemic, the FCSA Finds a Way to Spread Tidings of Comfort and Joy

Photo courtesy of the Siena College Franciscan Center for Service and Advocacy.

Each year, Judy Doughterty leads the team at the Franciscan Center for Service and Advocacy in collecting gifts and donations for their annual Giving Tree event. Typically, there is a tree stationed in popular spots on campus including the chapel, the atrium of the Sarazen Student Union, and the Foy Hall lobby. 

Due to campus-wide COVID restrictions, hosting this program in the traditional format is not possible, so Judy and her team got to work. 

It only took a matter of weeks for Judy’s virtual Christmas tree vision to come to life with the help of her student officers. She spent ample time fine-tuning the details of the virtual atmosphere and wanted to ensure that it was accessible to all that wish to participate.

The FCSA’s strong tradition in Franciscan Service and Advocacy has fostered a sense of community both on and off campus. The team in the Mission Office has sought out ways to continue creating connections during a time where we’re encouraged to stay distant from one another.

While the Giving Tree programming looks a bit different this year, the sentiment is just as genuine and now has the capacity to pull from a larger group of donors. Not even a pandemic can keep Judy and her team from spreading tidings of comfort and joy during the holiday season!

Visit the Virtual Giving Tree here: https://dailydigest.siena.edu/students/2020/10/11/its-beginning-to-look-a-lot-like-christmas-2/

Constitution Day 2020: Our Voices, Our Votes and How We Can Make a Difference

We the People of Siena College gathered on the evening of September 22nd to discuss the importance of our voices and our votes ahead of the November 2020 election. During this virtual gathering, a panel of Siena Community members was moderated by Dr. Leonard Cutler, who is the school’s Pre-Law Advisor and professor of classes including topics on Constitutional and Criminal Law. Dr. Cutler shared that although the program had mostly focused on student voter turnout, “every member of the Siena Community is encouraged to vote in this election”. 

The panelists engaged in a conversation that touched upon many different topics in the sphere of modern politics and voting concerns. Those that sat on the panel were Dr. Chris Gibson (Siena College President), Professor Annie Rody-Wright (Senior Teaching Assistant, Prof. of FYSM, and Sociology), Amir Taylor (Junior Political Science major on a Pre-Law Track), and Sami DeRagon (Junior Political Science major on a Pre-Law Track and Political Science Society President). The diversity in the academic and personal backgrounds of these individuals fueled a productive, inspirational, and fruitful discussion. 

Photo courtesy of Boston University

Professor Rody-Wright shared information about voter suppression, and how it is specifically prevalent among incarcerated populations. Honoring the recent passing of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Rody-Wright discussed RBG’s dissents from the bench and the way she would do so in order to “appeal to a future day”. Justice Ginsburg understood that the Voting Rights Act of 1965 was the only vehicle that would ensure fair elections, and never wavered in defending Voting Rights for all. Rody Wright added a very fitting quote from Maya Angelou to the dialogue, when showing up to cast one’s ballot “I come as one but stand as 10,000”. Enacting and encouraging the changes we wish to see in our government starts with voting. It continues when the voting population shows up for their community, when they show up to conversations with their representatives, and when they inspire others to get involved in movements both big and small.

Dr. Chris Gibson continued to touch upon the importance of the Voting Rights Act by calling it “The Crown Jewel of our democracy”. Inspired by the rise of youth voter turnout, Siena’s president shared that on his first day in office he coined an initiative that would seek to engage 100% of the Siena Community in a voter registration and participation effort. The Siena Votes team has worked to facilitate dropbox areas in multiple places around campus where individuals can find absentee ballot registration forms. Through this initiative, students and faculty can also take advantage of postage paid for by the College in requesting and submitting their ballots through October.

Sami DeRagon, as the president of the campus’ Political Science Society, has been at the forefront of the 100% voter registration and turnout initiative that President Gibson proposed at the beginning of his term at Siena. DeRagon shares that “Dr. Gibson set the tone on campus for Siena’s involvement in this election”. This conversation also explored the rise of youth voting in recent years, DeRagon sharing that Gen Z and Millennial voters make up 40% of participants in the latest elections. This means that 40% of voters are 18-38 years old, providing hope for a future that will be shaped and guided by new and politically-active perspectives. 

In 20 states across the country, more young people are registering to vote than did in the 2016 election. In recent election years, there has been more than double the amount of active young voters than there have been in the past. Amir Taylor connected with students who may feel that their vote doesn’t matter. His message was strong and clear, and he urged his fellow students, especially those whose ancestors fought for their right to vote, to be politically active early and often. 

If this event got one message home, it’s the message that our voices and our votes matter. Let us use this message and this election to incite and inspire the positive change we wish to see in this world. It is said that every long journey begins with one single step, and it’s clear to see that Saints are taking strides toward a more just future. 

For more information and resources regarding the upcoming election, students and faculty can reach out to vote@siena.edu to interact with a voter registration hotline.

Photo courtesy of Wikimedia.com

Newly Reunited Siena Saints “March Forward” Into a New Year

The sun rises over Siena Hall ahead of another academic year, photo courtesy of https://www.siena.edu/ .

Whether we’re first year or graduate students, when pulling into campus, Siena Hall’s iconic columns greet us by saying “Welcome to Siena”. For many of us, there’s no place like home, and after vacating campus for over five months, the feeling of being back at school is refreshing, to say the least. This year, move-in was during mid-August, when the late summer foliage was still as verdant as ever. As new and returning students alike re-connected on the quad, MacClosky square, the Paddock, and in their respective dorm rooms, rainbows of flowers sprouted from each plant bed in celebration of a newly reunited community. Even years of calling this campus home, the scenery never gets old. In fact, days before students began to move back, Conde Nast Traveler listed Siena’s campus one of the top 50 most beautiful in America, and now that we’re back and in-motion, I wholeheartedly agree. 

Tents on the quad have been added for more classroom, dining, and activity space, photo courtesy of the Siena College Twitter account.

Despite the addition of tent space for academic and social activities, our campus landscape still has the same breathtaking charm. Our campus climate, however, has adjusted to meticulously abide by local and international precautions to mitigate the spread of the Coronavirus. Our campus now has guest visitation restrictions, a mask requirement in every academic and residential building, sanitizing stations in every classroom and hallway, reduced occupancy in dining spaces (many of which only offer meal options to-go), and so much more. A comprehensive list of Siena’s responses to the pandemic can be found on the Marching Forward webpage. Our campus is the same hub of knowledge, school spirit, enthusiasm, and it is a little quieter and a lot cleaner than it has been in the past. 

It is incredible to think of how much of a difference a few months can make. This past summer incited fear, protest, education, adherence to safety measures, and a commitment to fight injustice. Peaceful protests demanding justice and accountability for the wrongful murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Elijah McClain, and countless others reach every corner of the United States. These calls for justice continue to be sustained to this day. 

At Siena, in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement, members of the Damietta Cross-Cultural Center and the Black Student Union organized a peaceful demonstration on campus that took place on Saturday, September 5th, 2020. During this event, members of the Black Student Union held space for conversation, reflection, and calls to action for students and educators. In conjunction with this demonstration, the Mission Office has organized an event series advocating for racial justice. The Office has hosted webinars and events live via zoom with distinguished guest speakers including Dr. Bettina Love, Nyle Fort, and Selwyn Jones addressing topics of allyship, mourning, and the Movement for Black Lives. Now more than ever, it is necessary to be the change and to demand the change our communities and our society need. 

To say the least, the past few months have challenged the status quo. Even if my friends and professors are partially hidden by masks or sequestered to a small box on Zoom, starting a new semester will always be a form of familiar chaos. I am optimistic that myself and my fellow students are ready to stay safe, attentive, and active during the upcoming school year. May we all use this as an opportunity to learn with and from one another, and create a considerate and respectful community for all. As our new president Dr. Chris Gibson reminds us, “No matter what the obstacle, as Siena Saints, we are always marching forward”.

Accessing Academic and Career Services from Home

Being away from campus doesn’t mean going without academic and career services. Over the past few weeks, Siena’s various resource offices have been working to develop new ways of aiding students remotely. These campus resources have made accessing support services easy for students to do from the comfort of their homes. 

The Writing Center

The Writing Center, a safe haven for when you need help composing an essay or creating citations, is now online! In place of in-person peer tutoring meetings, the center is now offering Zoom tutoring sessions. Zoom tutoring sessions can be with a professional or peer tutor and can be scheduled for a 60-minute time slot. After making your tutoring appointment with the Writing Center, your tutor will send you an email with further information. As we approach the due dates for final papers, make sure to schedule your tutoring appointment to hand in your best work!

SASE Tutoring Services

While group tutoring sessions have been canceled for the semester, individual tutoring with a tutor from the SASE office is now available through GoBoard. GoBoard acts as a free online tool that combines video conferencing with an interactive canvas, designed to help students collaborate one-on-one. Following your tutoring appointment, you will receive a document outlining all of the material shared on the screen throughout the session to keep as part of your notes! Questions regarding virtual tutoring services should be directed to tutoring@siena.edu

CEPD and Internship Programs Offices

Continue your career development journey with virtual counseling appointments through the CEPD and Internship Programs offices. To accommodate students from home, the offices are offering individual counseling appointments via phone calls, email, Google Chat or Video. The Office of Internship Programs even created a how-to video on requesting counseling appointments. Students are still able to receive assistance in their job search, creating their resume, and filling out internship applications. Even Mock Interviews are still available, for those looking to brush up on their skills, through Career Saint’s Interview Simulator tool. Be sure to visit Career Saint to access these virtual resources and email careermail@siena.edu for more information. 

During these strange times, we could all use a little support. So utilize these helpful academic and career services from the comfort of your home. Make sure to check in next week for another new blog post! In the meantime, follow our FacebookInstagramTwitterLinkedIn pages to stay up-to-date on all things Siena liberal arts. Stay well, Saints!

3 Reasons to LOVE Liberal Arts

Love is in the air, Saints! With Valentine’s Day approaching, let’s share some appreciation for our liberal arts studies. Here are 3 reasons to LOVE being a liberal arts student: 

1. The Emphasis on Humanity

In studying liberal arts, students are faced with issues regarding the human experience. Whether it be reading moral arguments in philosophy or reviewing the ethical treatment of participants in psychological research, our work consistently emphasizes the importance of humanity. To be a liberal arts student entails approaching problems with the improvement of the lives of everyday people in mind. Our inquiries, discussions, and research regarding human experiences are crucial in the betterment of the greater good. 

2. Strengthening the Most In-Demand Skills

According to Linkedin’s list of Skills Companies Need Most in 2020, the top soft skills employers want to see in new hires are creativity, persuasion, collaboration, adaptability, and emotional intelligence. Even if students do not realize it, we are constantly improving on all of these desirable skills through our coursework. Persuasion abilities shine through when political science students pose arguments in papers and copious amounts of creativity are put into every showcase, performance, and musical production that comes out of the creative arts department. Education students know how to quickly adapt to new classroom environments in their field placements while those studying communications learn how to collaborate effectively to accurately report on current events. Emotional intelligence is a staple of sociology and social work classes as students master reading and reacting to social situations. What’s not to love about gaining some of the most employable skills while also studying your passion?

3. Provides Room to Explore Interests and Career Paths

I have switched majors, traded minors, and even transferred schools. I have never been the type of person that has a clear academic or career path. It has been a frustrating journey, but being a liberal arts student has provided me the opportunity to explore my interests thoroughly. Liberal arts has allowed me to combine everything that intrigues me while working towards my degree. Looking to the future, having my B.A will help me explore multiple different career options as well. If you are a person that takes interest in many areas of study, you probably love (or will love) the freedom to grow that a liberal arts education provides. 

What do you love about your liberal arts program? Our SOLA Instagram (@sienaliberalarts) followers weighed in on the topic as well! When asked what they loved most about their field of study they responded…

  • @jordanglazier12 (economics major) : “The econ department at Siena is second to none and I’m confident that majoring in economics will open many doors and prepare me well for the workforce and/or grad school.”
  • @kaiti.hope (creative arts major with minors in English, psychology, and film studies: “I love how, with the Creative Arts major, I was able to tailor it to what I’m really interested in.”
  • @diannaapro (social work major with a pre-law certificate): “My favorite part of my field of study is that all of my professors are passionate and encourage us students to be our best!”

The day-to-day coursework can be stressful, but remember, there are so many reasons to love your liberal arts education. Share some liberal arts love and have a happy Valentine’s Day, Saints!

Spring 2020 Career Fair: Let’s Prep!

We are only three weeks out from Siena’s Spring 2020 Career, Internship, and Graduate School Fair. Whether you are a first-year student exploring career options, a sophomore or junior hoping to land an internship, or a senior applying to jobs and grad school, get excited for all of the opportunities the fair has to offer! If you are at all nervous about attending, check out these pre-career fair events. These events are designed to help diminish any nerves and to get you career fair ready.

Before you do anything else, let’s register! Don’t worry, it only takes a minute. Log into Career Saint, click on the “Events” tab located on the left-hand side of the screen and select “Spring Career Fair”. Proceed by clicking on “ 17th Annual Spring Career, Internship & Graduate School Fair 2020” and then hit “RSVP”. Now you are good to go! If you forget to register by the deadline, Wednesday, Feb. 19th, don’t worry! You can still partake as a walk-in. Ok, now onto the pre-fair prep events. 

Resume Critique 

Have your resume critiqued by professionals before handing it out to potential employers! On Feb. 19th from 12-2 pm, the Foy Hall Lobby is the spot to gain outside perspective on your current resume. The Resume Critique Hour also gives students the opportunity to make a good first impression with employers before the career fair even begins. If you can’t make it to the Resume Critique Hour, be sure to check out the CEPD’s office’s weekly drop-in schedule so that you can get your resume reviewed in time for the fair!

Dress for Success

As an underclassman, I did not own a single article of clothing that would pass as business professional attire. I didn’t even know what a business professional outfit really looked like. If you can at all relate, attend the Dress for Success Fashion Show on Feb. 19th at 9 pm in the SSU conference room. At the show, watch students and faculty model business-appropriate attire and get inspiration for your own career fair look. Can’t attend the fashion show? Check out this Siena Her Campus article where Emily Roehl ‘15 provides some helpful tips on how to dress to impress employers. 

Stand Out!

Stand out from your peers by brushing up on your career search knowledge on Feb. 24th in the Standish Library, room L26. During free period, employers will be present to provide resume, job search, and general professional advice that has helped them in their own careers. Not only will you improve your own professional abilities, but this event also serves as a great way to become more comfortable speaking with business professionals.

In addition to attending these events, don’t forget to check out the official Spring 2020 Career, Internship, and Graduate School Fair list of attending organizations prior to the fair. The career fair is on Wednesday, February 26th from 12 pm-4 pm in the MAC and after polishing up on your professional skills at the prep-events, you will be ready to meet your future employer. We hope to see you there, Saints! 

Developing Your Career Over Winter Break

Students have approximately five weeks away from Siena coming up. Yes, that means it will be a month of having to open doors for ourselves. 

I cherish my time off from coursework. After losing a decent amount of sleep throughout the semester, I make sure to catch up on all of my rest during the first week of winter break. However, after sleeping for a week straight, I am ready to do everything that I don’t have time for while classes are in session.

With little time to do so during the semester, here are a few ways you can develop your career over winter break:

1. Don’t 

I was not joking about sleeping for a week straight. Students spend 15 weeks each semester working diligently to balance courses, jobs, internships, clubs, organizations, sports teams, etc. We NEED to take time to relax on break. Get enough rest, spend time with loved ones, and do whatever else it is that makes you feel at ease. If you want to work on developing your future, you need to first take care of yourself in the present.

2. Volunteer 

Organizations are always looking for new volunteers, especially around the holidays. Volunteering can serve as a way to give back to a community or to help the less fortunate. In the process, volunteering can also help you develop skills that are often sought after by employers. Many volunteer positions include collaborating with a team, managing limited time and resources, and communicating effectively to complete a task. Helping out at a local organization this break can help you support those in need while gaining valuable skills and building up your resume in the process.

3. Create or Update your Resume 

If you can before break, make an appointment with the Career Education and Professional Development (CEPD) office on CareerSaint. Whether you are making your first resume or just looking to update your existing one, the CEPD office can help! You can take the notes from your appointment home with you and implement them into your resume during break. If you are unable to make an appointment, use the CEPD’s resume section in the 2019-2020 Career Guide as a template for improving your resume from home.

4. Apply for Spring and Summer Internships

One of the most important aspects of preparing yourself for a career is having internships. Internships are a great way to network, learn how to navigate a specific work environment, and to figure out if the career path you are on is right for you. Login into CareerSaint to see what recent postings there are for upcoming positions that spark your interest. Applying for internships can be a little time consuming, depending on the company. Some employers require your resume, a cover letter, a writing sample, a separate application, and more to apply. Completing internship applications during break is a great way to plan for your future career without having the stress of coursework distracting you. Visit the Internship Programs page to learn more about applying for internships.

5. Search for or Apply to Graduate Schools

If you are considering continuing your education, use winter break as a way to get ahead and to get organized! If you are still on the fence about going on to graduate studies, check LinkedIn to see the education level of individuals currently holding the job you want. If you are sure you want to go to grad school, but not sure which school is best for you, try using Peterson’s or The Princeton Review to compare programs! If you are a senior like myself, this break will serve as a time to finally send out applications if you haven’t already. All grad programs are different and can require different materials for applicants to provide. A spreadsheet can serve as a helpful tool to organize what each application requires. 

After you have recovered from the demands of the semester, be productive this winter break. You will thank yourself in the future for taking the time to put work into your career goals. Above all else, remember to take care of yourself first this break, Saints!

Recovering from Schedule-Overload

To say that I was overly ambitious entering senior year is an understatement. I’m no stranger to a jam-packed schedule, so I figured the final stretch of undergrad would be fairly manageable. I was excited to be taking on leadership roles in a few clubs, working nearly full-time hours, and having a 15 credit course load. It felt good reciting my schedule to friends and family, completely proud of myself for taking so much on.

Like many other students, I identify with being an overachiever and take advantage of every opportunity that comes my way. Unfortunately, also like many of my peers, I was quickly introduced to my limits as the semester unfolded. I ended up feeling trapped in my schedule and was buried in the workload I was so proud to be taking on just a few weeks prior.

Digging your way out of the rubble that comes after an overloaded-schedule-meltdown is no easy task. You have to challenge yourself and most likely have to step outside of your comfort zone. Even though the recovery might be painful, the reward of less stress and more time to reflect is worth it. Here are steps to bouncing back after taking on too much in the beginning of the school year. 

Step 1: Sort out what matters the most 

Go through your schedule and determine what matters the most to you. Ranking the importance of each commitment might be helpful in this process. Question your motives along the way. Do you still find being part of that club rewarding? Has picking up extra shifts at work really been worth losing sleep? Did you give yourself any time during the week to attend office hours or visit the Writing Center for academic support? Before you can start cutting commitments off, it is crucial to think through why you are doing what you’re doing. Determine what actually is or isn’t worth a slot in your schedule. 

Step 2: Cut off what is least important

After prioritizing, it is time to let go of what no longer holds high enough importance in your schedule. For myself, this was easily the most challenging part of the process. The thought of letting down, friends, co-workers, or advisors terrified me. What’s important to remember here is that stretching yourself too thin hurts both yourself and the people counting on you. By cutting ties with a few commitments, you will be better able to manage the ones you deemed as most important. So type that email, explain that this is what is best for you right now, hit send, and take a breath. The worst part of schedule clean-up is over. 

Step 3: Stay committed to less commitments

Having free time is a necessary aspect of academic success and overall well-being for college students. With this in mind, that doesn’t mean I am any less of a serial schedule-filler than I was before. I needed to declutter my days, but every now and then I am tempted to fill my open time slots with new opportunities as they present themselves. For myself and anyone else in this position, the key is to stay focused on the priorities back in step one. Stay committed to your new core schedule. Instead of only giving a little bit of your energy to many commitments, give your all to your most valued few. 

As college students, it will always be tempting to load up our schedules to maximum capacity. How could we not want to? There are so many awesome opportunities everywhere we turn on campus. As we settle into midterm season, there is no better time to do some schedule decluttering.

In addition to these steps, utilizing on-campus resources can also beneficial in sorting out your commitments. Be sure to check in with the Career Center, Counseling Center, or School of Liberal Arts Office for additional advice in sorting out your workload. And most importantly, always remember to schedule time to take care of yourself first, Saints!